Mountain Song and Story with Toni Doman - Birthplace of Country Music

Mountain Song and Story with Toni Doman

Mountain Song & Story tells the tales and Folklore of the people who make up the rich cultural tapestry of Central Appalachia. Showcasing influential Appalachian artisans and traditions through in depth interviews, music and storytelling “Mountain Song & Story” aims to promote our arts and culture for a greater understanding of the region.”

 

News from the Host

1/17/19
Episode 21 “Jack Tales”

Jack Tales are stories that are a rich part of Appalachian culture, and they’ve been passed down orally for generations with origins related to early Scotch Irish and German immigrants. The stories always feature a central character named Jack, who’s always getting into mischief, and in the end of the story seems to come out as the winner. Today’s show highlights some of the history behind these tales and features a live reading of the Jack Tale,  Jack and the Varmints. 

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, January 17th, 2019.

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Songs from this week’s show

Black Jack David – The Carter Family
Jackpot – Nikki Lane
Lily, Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts –Bob Dylan
Hit The Road Jack – Ray Charles
Jackie Blue – Ozark Mountain Daredevils
Jack Tarr The Sailor – Harvey Reid
Jackson – June Carter and Johnny Cash
Hit That Jive, Jack – Nat King Cole
Portland Oregon – Jack White and Loretta Lynn
From a Jack to a King – Ned Miller
Jack of Diamonds – Mark Campbell
Ramblin’ Jack and Mahan – Guy Clark

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

Jack Tales
Introduction to Jack Tales
The Jack Tales, North Carolina Heritage Tales
Jack and the Varmints
History: Appalachian Jack Tales

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1/10/19

Episode 20 “Appalachian Ballads with Special Guest Ted Olson”

The theme song for the Mountain Song & Story features the tune Omni Wise from the Album Big Bend Killing: The Appalachian Ballad Tradition. The Appalachian ballad tradition is alive among a new generation of singers, most of whom learned their songs directly from an oral tradition, either from older singers, or from recordings, or both. The project Big Bend Killing was produced by East TN State University professor, Dr. Ted Olson and today on the show we air an interview with him discussing his work in Appalachian music and history and featuring songs from the album.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, January 10th, 2019.

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Songs from this week’s show

Big Bend Killing – Alice Gerrard
John Henry (feat. Roy Andrade) – Amythyst Kiah
The Farmer’s Curst Wife – Donna Ray Norton
Wreck of the Old 97 – Corbin Hayslett
Mr. Frog Went a-Courtin’ – Bill and the Belles
Eggs and Marrowbone (feat. Kate Brislin) Jody Stecher
The Parting Glass – Rosanne Cash

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

Big Bend Killing: The Appalachian Ballad Tradition
Ted Olson

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1/3/19

Episode 19 “New Years”

Today we take a look forward into the New Year and check out some of the history, folklore and stories surrounding the celebration of New Years.  At the end of every year we have the chance to reflect and look back at the previous year and we also celebrate what is to come. We also have an interesting ways celebrating,  from setting resolutions and goals for ourselves, to different superstitions we practice for good luck. Some of these interesting superstitions and traditions have managed to survive the test of time and still be practiced today. Today we’re celebrating the New Year though song and story.  

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, January 3rd, 2019

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Songs from this week’s show

Bringing in a Brand New Year – Charles Brown
New Year’s Eve – Brian Cullman
What Are You Doing New Year’s Eve – Ella Fitzgerald
Snowy Mornin – The Old New Year – Arnie Naiman
Happy New Year Darling – Lonnie Johnson
New Year’s Resolution – Otis Redding
The Life You Chose – Jason Isbell
New Year’s Day – Charlie Robison
New Year’s Eve – Peter Parcek
After News Year Eve – The Heartbeats
Ashokan Farewell – Jay Unger and Molly Mason

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

Auld Lang Syne
The History of New Year’s Resolutions
New Year’s Folklore and Superstitions
New Year Superstitions, Customs and Folktales from Victorian Derbyshire
Old Folktales Die Hard
Why We Really Celebrate New Year’s Day
What Does “Auld Lang Syne” Really Mean?

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12/20/18

Episode 18 “winter”

Modern Christmas traditions have been pulled across cultures throughout time, and every year we prep for our own traditions and holiday activities. Children write letters to Santa all around the world and in rural communities of Appalachia, children would once burned their letters in fireplaces and “fairies” would carry their message up the chimney to be delivered  to Santa. Today’s show  features a German folktale reading, entitled The Christmas Fairy of Strasburg as well as more origins of interesting Christmas traditions!

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, December 20th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

North To Alaska – Johnny Horton
Rain and Snow – Molly Tuttle
Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer – Ella Fitzgerald and Bing Crosby
Meet Me Under The Mistletoe – Randy Travis
If We Make It Through December – Merle Haggard
Cold, Cold Heart – Hank Williams
What A Wonderful World – Sam Cooke
Pretty Paper -Willie Nelson
A Dreamer’s Holiday – Willie Nelson
Hot Corn, Cold Corn – Robert Earl Keen
Footprints In The Snow – Jimmy Martin
When it’s Springtime in Alaska – Johnny Horton

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

Appalachian Christmas
Apple Stack Cake Delivers the History of Appalachia to the Holiday Table
7 Appalachian Christmas Traditions
Eat, Drink & Be Merry: A Christmas Miscellany
The Roots of Appalachian Christmas Traditions
The Christmas Fairy of Strasburg
History of Christmas
The History of Christmas Trees
Helvetia, WV
Santa Claus
Who is Krampus

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12/13/18

Episode 17 “The Moon”

The coming of Winter also brings the coming of a new full moon. December welcomes the rightfully named Cold Moon, and every month the full moon is named accordingly. The Wolf Moon of January and the Snow Moon of February are a few more winter moons you’ll soon see in the night sky. The moon has been a huge inspiration for creativity – from poems, to artists, and countless songs. On today’s show we dive into some stories and songs inspired by this cosmic wonder and featuring an Appalachian folktale about the Harvest Moon, and unveil the mystery behind how we use the phases of the moon to predict  weather. 

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, December 13th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Walking After Midnight – Patsy Cline
When My Blue Moon Turns To Gold Again – Elvis Presley
It’s Only A Paper Moon – Ella Fitzgerald, The Delta Rhythm Boys
Moon River – Henry Mancini
We Two Are a Moon – Sam Beam and Jesca Hoop
Moondance – Van Morrison
Howlin’ at the Moon – Hank Williams
Blue Moon of Kentucky – George Jones and Melba Montgomery
Jealous Of The Moon – Nickel Creek
Sitting Alone in the Moonlight – Various Artists
The Devil’s in the Jukebox – Ray Lamontagne
Harvest Moon – Neil Young
Bad Moon Rising – CCR

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

Beware the Hunter’s Moon
Full Moon Names, Explained
Full Moon for December 2018
How did the Farmers’ Almanac ‘nail’ this winter’s forecast? That’s a secret
How Does The Almanac Predict The Weather?
The History of the Old Farmer’s Almanac
The Moon Rabbit in Legend and Culture
Pareidolia Definition

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12/6/18

Episode 16 “TIME”

It’s that time of year again, when it gets dark outside way to early. The days have been and will continue to get shorter until the winter solstice arrives,  the shortest day of the calendar year on December 21st, also marking the first day of winter. Personally I’m dreaming of longer, sunnier days. On this episode we take a look into the history of daylight saving time and  feature some stories related to the concept of time, complete with a German folktale reading of Peter Klaus, the original Rip Van Winkle.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, December 6th, 2018. 

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Songs from this week’s show

Time in a Bottle – Jim Croce
Time Don’t Wait – Marty Stuart
Time After All – Sturgill Simpson
Never Going Back Again – Fleetwood Mac
All The Reaching Trims – Daniel Romano
Fly Like An Eagle – Steve Miller Band
Hard Times – Ray Charles
Wayside / Back In Time – Gillian Welch
Time To Believe In – The Deslondes
My San Antonio Rose – The Time Jumpers
Time Flies – Jim Lauderdale
Funny How Time Slips Away – Willie Nelson

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

8 Things You May Not Know About Daylight Saving Time
The Story of Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving
Rip Van Winkle
Peter Klaus
History of Daylight Saving Time
The History (and Possible Future) of Daylight Saving Time

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11/29/18

Episode 15 “birds”

In honor of Thanksgiving last week, today we are talking not just turkey but all all birds! From rich and sometimes ominous symbolism, birds have been soaring into stories for centuries. Sometimes they represent good, sometimes they’re bringing bad news. Today we take a look at the symbolism of birds and also dive into the Grimms Fairy Tale collection and feature a reading titled. The Mouse, The Bird, and the Sausage”.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, November 29th, 2018. 

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Songs from this week’s show

Winter’s Come and Gone – Gillian Welch
Little Birdie – The Stanley Brothers
Fare Thee Well (Inside Llewyn Davis Soundtrack) – Oscar Isaac and Marcus Mumford
Bluebird Wine – Rodney Crowell
Johnny Cash – Bird on a Wire
The Cuckoo Bird – Doc Watson
Roll Away – Birds of Chicago
High Flying Bird – Tim O’Brian
Little Red Bird – 40 Watt Dreams
Clay Pigeons – John Prine
The Great Speckled Bird – Roy Acuff & The Smoky Mountain Boys
Mocking Bird Yodel – Carolina Cotton

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

Death Takes Wing: Birds and the Folklore of Death
The Mouse, The Bird, and the Sausage
The Publication of Grimm’s Fairy Tales
Delving into Cultural Myths, Tales and Beliefs About Wild Birds
Cherokee and Bird Stories

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11/8/18

Episode 14 “HOME”

Here in Appalachia, leaving home to seek opportunities elsewhere is a reality for many young residents. The current lack of opportunity is a hot topic among young Appalachians, and you’ve most likely heard the stories – for years. Young people tend to leave their small rural towns and head off to major cities. But what happens we you move away from home? Today on the show we have some tunes that feature being homesick and some fitting folktales about leaving home.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, November 8th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Homesick – Jimmy Martin
Yum Yum – The Deslondes
Home – Roger Miller
This Town Gets Around – Margo Price
My Tennessee Mountain Home – Dolly Parton
In A Town This Size – John Prine
Let’s Go Home – George Jones
I’m on My Way Home Again – The Everly Brothers
This Town – Roger Miller
Bring It On Home To Me – Sam Cooke
Are You Homesick in Carolina – The Po’ Ramblin’ Boys
Homeward Bound – Simon & Garfunkel
Take Me Home Country Roads – John Denver

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

Appalachia Will Always Be Home For Many Who’ve Left
Returning Home, These West Virginians Are Rewriting The Poetry of Appalachia
The Revivalist: Word From the Appalachian South
West Virginia’s “Home of the Millionaires”
What Exactly Is Appalachian Cuisine?
The Next Big Thing in American Regional Cooking: Humble Appalachia

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11/1/18

Episode 13 “Work Songs”

Today we dive into the theme of working – from traditional tunes to country favorites, throughout the history of Appalachia work has been a prominent theme in songs and tales. Today I’ve featured the popular and well known American folktale of the legendary John Henry, a steel driving man who is said to be a freed slave, and is immortalized in song as the ultimate working-class hero. Tune in to also here some interesting Appalachian history about work songs.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday November 1st, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

John Henry – Dave Van Ronk
9-5 – Dolly Parton
To the Work – Keb’ Mo’
Unloading Steel Rails (Library of Congress Audio Recording) – Henry Truvillion
Tall Buildings – Ana Egge
Working Girl Blues – Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard
Working Man Blues – Merle Haggard
Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues – Jim Croce
John Henry – Amythyst Kiah
Chain Gang – Sam Cooke
Take This Job and Shove It – Johnny Paycheck
It’s Quittin Time – Keith Whitley
Detroit City ( I Wanna Go Home) – Bobby Bare (Ft. Chris Stapleton)
I Ain’t Gonna Work Tomorrow – Lynda Dawson & Pattie Hopkins

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

Virginia Traditions: Virginia Work Songs
Traditional Work Songs
Taking Swings at a Myth, With John Henry the Man
Appalachian Traditional Music – A Short History
John Henry: Hero of American Folklore
Bringing The Banjo From ‘Africa To Appalachia’
AMERICAN STORIES: John Henry (Story Segment Reading)
Unloading Steel Rails – Library of Congress Audio Recording

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10/25/18

Episode 12 “Halloween”

Today on Mountain Song and Story we are wrapping up a month long celebration of all things Halloween! From Appalachian murder ballads, to ghosts and witches, it’s been an October chock full of tales of the supernatural. Each week here on the show I love to dive in and feature regional folklore stories and music – today we take a look at the history of Halloween and feature tales of a variety of mysterious Appalachian monsters, haunted places and more. Check out the show to hear all about the Jersey Devil, the mysterious Mothman, and the haunted Rotherwood Mansion in Kingsport Tennessee.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Wednesday October 31st, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Monsters Holiday – Buck Owens
Little Red Riding Hood – Sam Sham and The Pharaohs
Midnight in Montgomery – Alan Jackson
You’re The Devil in Disguise – Elvis Presley
Satan is Real – The Louvin Brothers
Devils in The Jukebox – Ray Lamontagne
I’ll Fly Away – Hank Williams Sr.
Two Story House – George Jones and Tammy Wynette
Old, Old, House – George Jones
Haunted House – Eilen Jewell
Haunted House – John Fogerty
The Cat Came Back – Sonny James
Fist City – Loretta Lynn
If We Forgot God – Charlie Bailey The Happy Valley Boys

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

Halloween 2018
The Jersey Devil and Folklore
Mothman: The Enigma of Point Pleasant
Rotherwood: House of Hell
The Real Story of the Mothman Prophecies
41 Spooky Facts About Halloween

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10/18/18

Episode 11 “Ghosts”

Ghosts. You’ve read stories about them, you’ve heard songs about them, you may have even seen one a time or two. Ghosts are a huge inspiration for entertainment, and if you’re like me some of us love the thrill of a good mystery. On the show today, I’ve featured some tales that are fitting with our ghostly theme of songs that highlight these mysterious apparitions. When ghosts are featured in a song, they can appear as central character and can also be figurative and even literal. Sometimes they come back to tell the narrator of the song a message from beyond, and sometimes they come back for vengeance. On this episode, I’ve featured some of these supernatural songs and also explain some of the history and inspiration behind the lyrics.

Be sure to check out past Mountain Song & Story shows – all month long in October I’ve been featuring the strange and supernatural in honor of Halloween!

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, October 11th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Ain’t No Grave – Johnny Cash
Ghost Train Four-Oh-Ten – Marty Stuart
Ghost On The Canvas – Glen Campbell
Wayfaring Stranger – Natalie Merchant
Brown Mountain Light – The Country Gentlemen
Bringing Mary Home – The Country Gentlemen
The Carroll County Accident – Porter Wagoner
Ghost Riders in the Sky – Johnny Cash
Long Black Veil – Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard
Sittin’ Up With The Dead – Ray Stevens
Diggin Up Bones – Randy Travis
Unquiet Grave – Jean Ritchie

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Story Segment Sound Effects by Summer Apostol

Resources and Additional Materials

Ghost Stories in Song for Halloween
Appalachian Lifestyles – Superstitions
10 Global Versions Of The Lady In White Legend
Behind The Song: “Long Black Veil”
Why Do People Wear Black for Mourning?

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10/11/18
Episode 10 “Witches”

Here in Appalachia, witches have a large role in Folklore and stories. You might have heard about some frightful Halloween tale about a witch haunting, like the story of the Bell Witch of Tennessee, which over the years has become a staple in Southern American Folktales. The story begins when a man by the name of John Bell moved his family to Tennessee. There they family began to be haunted by an evil spirit, eventually becoming known as the Bell Witch.

There are some very good witches that are worth mentioning through the history of Appalachia! In the past when early settlers and people of the mountains lived in isolated areas, often it wasn’t convenient to get access to hospitals and direct medical attention. So, people would often turn to the next best thing: witches. One type of witch someone might seek out, was a granny witch. They also might have been called other names, like a “Witch Doctor”. Having the title as a witch doctor in your community was actually a honor, as they often assisted people with their ailments,

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, October 11th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Wicked Old Witch – John Fogerty
Witch Trials – Town Mountain
Witchcraft – Frank Sinatra
Marie Laveau – Bobby Bare
Fatal Flower Garden – Nelstone’s Hawaiians
The Legend Of Wooley Swamp – The Charlie Daniels Band
Season of the Witch – Donovan
Under Your Spell Again – Buck Owens
The Witch Doctor Life – Captian Beefheart and The Magic Band
Psycho – Eddie Noack
Ghosts of Mississippi – The Steeldrivers
Polly Put The Kettle On – The Stuart Brothers-The Stuart Brothers
Long Black Veil – Johnny Cash

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

The Bell Witch Story
Granny Witches of Appalachia
The Foxfire Book Series That Preserved Appalachian Foodways

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10/4/18

Episode 9 “Appalachian Murder Ballads and More”

Country and Appalachian music has a rich history where early artists performed songs that covered a wide range of subject matter. Murder ballads have a deep history in the Appalachian mountains and in this episode we take a closer look at the history of some of these popular tunes and inspiration behind them. Acting as a subgenre of American Traditional Ballads, these songs are often derived from inspiration across cultures. They are seen in many genres of music from folk, country, bluegrass,rock, blues music and more. These ballads were often first written as poetry – designed to tell the tale of a murderer, and have been around for generations. The American South and folk music is strongly associated with these types of ballads and traditionally in folk and bluegrass style genres, common themes in songs might revolve around love, loss, heartache and death.

All throughout the month of October on the show we will be diving into the strange, spooky and spectacular!

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, October 4th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

River Bottom – The Country Gentlemen
Banks of the Ohio – Doyle Lawson
Frankie and Johnny – Gene Autry
Long Black Veil – Johnny Cash
Kate McCannon- Colter Wall
Knoxville Girl – The Louvin Brothers
Don’t Weep For Me – Ralph Stanley
Little Omie – Wise – Doc Watson
Pretty Polly – Bela Fleck & Abigail Washburn
Caleb Meyer – Gillian Welch
I Hung My Head – Johnny Cash

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

Killer Songs: The 10 Creepiest Country Murder Ballads
Southern Murder Ballads and Outlaw Folk Songs Based on True Stories
Eight of the Most Overlooked Bluegrass Murder Ballads
‘Poor Boy, You’re Bound to Die’ – Murder Ballads
Ten Murder Ballads That’ll Slay You
Murder by Gaslight: The Knoxville Girl

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9/20/18

Episode 8: “1927 Bristol Sessions”

In honor of the Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion Music festival, Our theme today is the historic 1927 Bristol Recording Sessions. First of all Bristol is 2 states – Virginia and Tennessee with two separate governments and one of the main reasons the town exists at all is because of the railroad. For over 100 years, the passenger rail in Bristol was the primary means of transportation around the area – those that lived in the area saw it all, from the Civil War to the late 1960s. There are also countless song about trains, which has been a big inspiration for songwriters and mountain folk who simply sang about their daily life. Bristol TN was named “Bristol” first, it wasn’t until 1890 that Virginia decided to change its name from “Goodson VA” to Bristol. The rail service that ran through the town dealt primarily with coal and freight traffic, but was also instrumental in bringing people and mail to the town, and like many southern towns, is a major reason why the town surround the rain way station grew economically and in population. The train service from ran continuously from 1856-1971. As trains were a common and popular subjects in many songs early 20th centuries, train songs could cover several themes – from railroad construction (like the tune about John Henry) to hobo life on the rails.

The sessions here were historic because they were innovative. Recording equipment was new at this time, and most Appalachian people who were long settled in the hills and valleys in rural communities often used music as a social pastime. And what I love about this music is that people weren’t really trying to strike it rich and become famous, they were playing music because it was part of their entertainment. They sang about what they knew. Heartache, love, loss, daily life, these are just some of the themes people sang about their experiences, and that’s part of what makes this music so genuine and honest.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, September 20th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Little Black Train – Carter Family
John Henry – Amythyst Kiah
Statesboro Blues – Taj Mahal
Good Enough – Molly Tuttle
Blue Yodel #9 – Jimmie Rodgers
Drinkin’ Dark Whiskey – The SteelDrivers
Sixteen Tons – Tennessee Ernie Ford
My Baby Makes Me Gravy – Dale Watson
Miles and Miles of Texas – Asleep at the Wheel
Set My Soul on Fire – The War and Treaty
Super 8 – Jason Isbell
Train on the Island – Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard
I Hear Them All – Old Crow Medicine Show

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

The Birthplace of Country Music Museum
Ghosts of Bristol: Haunting Tales from the Twin Cities
Bristol Herald Courier – “We’re Here Because of Railroads”
The Grand Ole Opry and WSM Since 1925

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9/13/18

Episode 7: “Coal

Appalachia and coal mining. Way before early settlers found their way into the Appalachian hills and mountains, this region was wild.  Here among the rolling hills there was once a time and place virtually hidden from the outside world and only uncharted, rugged mountain wilderness could be found. By the time early settlers called these mountains and valleys their home, a unique Appalachian culture formed here – largely because of the region’s isolation. Appalachian has a rich history of people, culture and heritage. Over time coal mining soon became part of that heritage. Throughout history here in Appalachia, there are countless songs and tales about coal mining and its impact on not only the landscape, of but the people.

A popular tune that highlights the everyday life of a coal miner is the song, “Sixteen Tons” which was originally written by Merle Travis and first released in July of 1947 from Capitol Records on Travis’ album “Folk Songs of the Hills”. It was gained popularity from the 1955 version by Tennessee Ernie Ford.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, September 13th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Miners’ Prayer – Dwight Yoakam
You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive – Patty Loveless
Dark as a Dungeon – The Chieftains Featuring Vince Gill
Paradise – John Prine
Coal – Tyler Childers
Coal Miner’s Blues – The Carter Family
Sixteen Tons – Merle Travis
Sixteen Tons – Tennessee Ernie Ford
Acony Bell – Gillian Welch
Coal Miner’s Daughter – Loretta Lynn
Angel From Montgomery – John Prine & Bonnie Rait
I’m a Coal Mining Man – Tom T. Hall
Some Dark Holler – Dwight Yoakam
Blowing in the Wind –  Willie Nelson

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

Did Coal Miners “Owe Their Souls to the Company Store? Theory and Evidence from the Early 1900s
Mining Folklore, The Midnight Society
West Virginia Coal Mining’s Dark Past
The Violent Remaking of Appalachia
Tommy Knockers: A California Ghost Story
Miner Folklore And Superstitions, Coal Region History Chronicles

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9/6/18

Episode 6: “Hounds”

Throughout history, humans have found companionship in four legged friends and companions – the dog. There are many stories centered around them and they actually have a pretty large role in myths and folklore throughout different cultures and time. Dogs symbolize loyalty and friendship, but are also closely associated with death in many English and European stories. You might have heard tales of “The Grim” – a large black dog and nocturnal creature that often appears in the night to foretell death  – The Grims origins can be traced back to mythology of the British Isles, but appear in more modern day settings, like the “Hound of the Baskervilles” the novel by Arthur Conan Doyle and even in The Harry Potter Universe (swoon). Here in Appalachian, dogs have been a central part of rural history, from hunting to farming, to the theme and inspiration for countless songs.

On today’s show we dive into to some spooky stories and folklore about devil dogs, including “The Black Dog of the Blue Ridge”, a tale by Mrs. R.F. Herrick  from the Journal of American Folklore from 1907. WOOF!

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, September 6th, 2018.

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Songs from this week’s show

Hound Dog – Elvis Presley
Dog –  Charlie Parr
Lawdog – Town Mountain
Move It On Over – Hank Williams
Hound Dog – Big Mama Thornton
Hellhound on my Trail – Robert Johnson
Chattanooga Dog – Jimmy Martin
Devils in the Jukebox – Ray Lamontagne and the Pariah Dogs
Ole Rattler – Grandpa Jones
Tennessee Hound Dog – The Osborne Brothers
Black Dog Blues – Russell Morris
Mr. Bojangles – The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

The Black Dog of the Blue Ridge
The Hell Hound of Appalachia
The Black Dog of the Blue Ridge, Journal of American Folklore (1907)
Dog Folklore and Legends

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8/30/18

Episode 5: “Bootlegging Women and Moonshine”

Daisy Simpson, known as the “Lady Hooch Hunter”, was one of the first women Prohibition Agents in the early 1920s.

Daisy Simpson, known as the “Lady Hooch Hunter”, was one of the first women Prohibition Agents in the early 1920s.

Moonshine. In. Appalachia. Moonshine actually has a heavy history here in Appalachia and in the US, and the term moon-shining literally describes the process – the fact that people make “shine” at “night” so to stay hidden from authority. With a rich history in the southern Appalachian mountains, the mountain people at one point in history actually could have a pretty substantial income moon-shining. It’s even portrayed in symbols relating to mountain culture, like the mountaineer, who represents individualism and self reliance and resistance to outside authority. While now, moon-shining is a fading tradition. Sugar prices tripled in the 1950s, a main ingredient in moonshine. Quite a few bootleggers were driven out of business at the time. The economy has since changed creating different opportunities for young men that might formerly have gone into moon-shining. On today’s show, we take a closer look into the history and stories surrounding moonshine, bootleggers, and some prominent, sometimes notorious women associated with distinctly Appalachian booze.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, August 30th 2018.

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    Songs from this week’s show

Chug a Lug – Roger Miller
Hurtin’ (On The Bottle) – Margo Price
Rye Whiskey – Punch Brothers
Don’t Come Home A – Drinkin – Loretta Lynn
Bluebird Wine – Rodney Crowell
White Lightning – George Jones
Whiskey with Tears – Town Mountain
Whiskey and You – Chris Stapleton
Drinkin Dark Whiskey Telling White Lies  – The Steeldrivers
Mountain Dew – Grandpa Jones
Out on a Drunk / Honky Tonk Flame – Tyler Childers
Tequila – Jim Reeves

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

 Resources and Additional Materials

Women Bootleggers and Women Prohibition Agents
On Exhibit: “Lady Hooch Hunter”. Pieces of History, National Archives
Women’s History Month Spotlight: Women Bootleggers
Prohibition Agent Georgia Hopley
It’s All Legal Until You Get Caught: Moonshining in the Southern Appalachians

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8/23/18

Episode 4: “Snakes”

Snakes. Alot of people are afraid of them. But are they misunderstood creatures? Snakes are found in stories and folklore across numerous cultures and serpent mythology is strongly tied to the cycle of life, death and rebirth. Has anyone ever told you that they keep a rattlesnake rattle in the body of their fiddle or mandolin? Many musicians today keep a rattle inside of their instruments swearing that it helps create a sweeter sound or maybe it’s for magic and just plain good luck. Today, were going to be diving into some myths and stories surround the topic of snakes. Welcome to Mountain Song & Story!

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, August 23rd 2018.

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    Songs from this week’s show

The Dreadful Snake – Ralph Stanley
Sneaky Snake – Tom T. Hall
Old Rattler – Grandpa Jones
Snake Eyes – The Wood Brothers
Shake, Rattle, and Roll – Elvis Presley
Snake Song – Isobel Campbell & Mark Lanegan
The Snakes Crawl at Night – Charley Pride
The Viper – Paul Lenart & Billy Novick
Rattled – The Traveling Wilburys
Snake Mountain Blues – Colter Wall
Rattlesnakin Daddy – Boots Woodall
Snake Eyes – The Milk Carton Kids
Black Snake Moan – Spencer Moore
Snake Oil – Steve Earle
Who Do You Love – Townes Van Zandt

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

Resources and Additional Materials

Ghost of Fiddlers Rock, Strange Tales of the American South
Rattlesnakes Fangs, Fiddles and Folklore

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8/16/18

Episode 3: “Square Dancing”

This week we sat down with Tyler Hughes who hails from Big Stone Gap VA and learned about square dancing and more! Tyler is an avid musician and dance caller and during our interview we learned about some of the things he is doing to make an impact in SWVA and the Appalachian region. 

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Thursday, August 16th 2018.

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    Songs fro

m this week’s show

East Tennessee Blues – Tommy Jackson
Dance, Dance, Dance – Steve Miller Band
Dearly Departed – Shakey Graves
Dance Around Molly – Roy Acuff & The Smoky Mountain Boys
Stay a Little Longer – Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys
Dance – Roy Orbison

Audio Story Segment:
At an Old-Time Dance (interview with Hobart Smith)
Additional Audio:
The Square Dance Fight – Seven Foot Dilly pt. 2
Bugs Bunny Square Dance Audio

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price

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8/9/18

Episode 2: “Woodworking”

On this week’s episode of Mountain Song & Story, we sat down with Skip Herman, a luthier from Abingdon, VA. Skip is a musician and has been working restoring instruments for nearly 40 years. He currently owns an instrument repair shop located at his home and has combined his hobby of repairing instruments and his love or music together. Check out the full episode of Mountain Song & Story to hear my interview and more with Skip Herman.

Music from this week’s show relate to today’s theme in honor of my guest. A luthier is defined as a craftsman and a maker of instruments. Songs about woodworking, guitars, and the materials you would need to build an instrument are featured on today’s program.  

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Wednesday, August 15th 2018.

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    Songs from this week’s show

My Heart Skips a Beat – Buck Owens
Setting the Woods on Fire – Hank Williams
Me and My Guitar – Tony Rice
Tried and Tempted – The Wood Brothers
Cumberland Gap – Woody Guthrie
Gonna Lay Down My Old Guitar – Norman Blake
Lonesome Pine – Blue Highway
Maple on the Hill – Albert Ash and the Whitetop Mountain Band
Rosewood Casket – Dolly Parton
Samson and Delilah – Willie Watson

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Interview Sound Engineer assistance by KT Vandyke

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8/2/18

Episode 1 “Gardens and Everything In Between

Welcome to very first episode of Mountain Song & Story! A new program on Radio Bristol that takes you beyond the lyrics of our Appalachian sound. Mountain Song & Story tells the tales and Folklore of the people who make up the rich cultural tapestry of Central Appalachia. Showcasing influential Appalachian artisans and traditions through in depth interviews, music and storytelling “Mountain Song & Stories” aims to promote our arts and culture for a greater understanding of the region.

Part of Mountain Song & Story is to showcase interesting artisans and this week I made a visit to the Beagle Ridge Herb Farm located in Wytheville, Virginia and spoke with owner and educator Ellen Reynolds to learn all about the farm’s local and regional impact. Ellen hosts educational classes and workshops at the farm and specializes in growing Lavender.  Beagle Ridge is home to beautiful display gardens, hiking trails, butterfly gardens, and educational opportunities relating to gardening  and everything in between.

Music this week relates to today’s show theme of “Gardens and Everything in Between”. You can listen to my interview with Ellen and the full episode of Mountain Song & Story here on this page under the show archives. Check out the Beagle Ridge website at https://beagleridge.org/ to learn more.

To listen to today’s show, check out the Show Archives at the bottom of this page from Monday August 6th, 2018

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    Songs from this week’s show

Wildwood Flower- The Carter Family
So Long Honeybee, Goodbye – Pokey LaFarge & The South City Three
Honey, Honey – The Milk Carton Kids
A Little Honey – Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats
Hummingbird – Traveller
Turtle Dove and The Crow – Mandolin Orange
Tall, Tall Trees – Roger Miller
The Parakeet – James Hand
Fiddlehead Fern – Cahalen Morrison & Eli West
Forgotten Flowers – John Fullbright

Intro and theme music Omie Wise (feat. Kalia Yeagle) by Hasee Ciaccio
Background instrumental music Fisher’s Hornpipe and June Apple by Brittany Haas
A Little Pain – Margo Price
Interview Sound Engineer assistance by KT Vandyke

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